Spanish Possessives: Get to Know Possessive Adjectives and Pronouns
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Possessives in Spanish: The Simple Guide

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Spanish possessives

This article is for you to read at your own pace. It’s our pleasure to provide you with this lesson.

What are Spanish possessives?

Possessives (in bold above) are used to describe who owns (or possesses) something. We can split Spanish possessives into groups:

1) Possessive adjectives

  • Short form
  • Longer form

2) Possessive pronouns

We'll look at them bit by bit!

Spanish Possessive adjectives—short form

The short version is the most common form of Spanish possessive adjectives, and you just stick it in front of the noun.

A really important thing to remember about Spanish possessives is that the possessive adjective has to agree in number (and gender) with the thing that’s possessed, not the person possessing it. We’ll show you some examples later.

Here are the short form possessive adjectives:

mi(s)my
tu(s)your (familiar singular)
su(s)his/her/its
your (formal singular)
nuestro(s)/nuestra(s)our
vuestro(s)/vuestra(s)your (familiar plural)
su(s)their
your (formal plural)

It helps to look at the words in context, and get a bit of practice. Here are some example sentences to start you off:

Estoy buscando mi llave.I’m looking for my key.
Estoy buscando mis llaves.I’m looking for my keys.
Toma tu libro.Take your book.
Toma tus libros.Take your books.
Alejandra ha perdido su lentilla.Alejandra has lost her contact lens.
Alejandra ha perdido sus gafas.Alejandra has lost her glasses.
Señora, ¿dónde está su perro?Madam, where is your (formal) dog?
Nosotros*/nosotras* estamos en nuestro país.We are in our country.
Nosotros*/nosotras* estamos en nuestra casa.We are in our house.
Estamos con nuestros primos.We are with our male/mixed group of cousins.
Estamos con nuestras primas.We are with our female cousins.
¿Quién es vuestro padre?Who is your (familiar plural) father?
¿Dónde está vuestra madre?Where is your mother?
¿Quiénes son vuestros padres?Who are your parents?
¿Dónde están vuestras hermanas?Where are your sisters?
Soy su hija.I’m their daughter.
Soy su camarero.I’m your (formal plural) waiter.

*Remember, it doesn’t matter here what gender we are. What matters is the gender of the object that we own! The same goes for vuestro/a/os/as—it agrees with the thing being possessed, NOT the possessor!

Spanish Possessive adjectives—longer form

These mean pretty much the same as the short form adjectives, but they help to emphasize who is possessing, rather than focusing on the possessed object! We place them after the noun being possessed.

This time, it’s not just nuestro and vuestro that have to agree in gender. All the forms have to agree in gender (m/f) AND number (singular/plural) with the thing being possessed.
mío(s)/mía(s)mine
tuyo(s)/tuya(s)yours (familiar singular)
suyo(s)/suya(s)his/hers
yours (formal singular)
nuestro(s)/nuestra(s)ours
vuestro(s)/vuestra(s)yours (familiar plural)
suyo(s)/suya(s)theirs
yours (formal plural)

As you look at the following examples, remember that suyo(s)/suya(s) can have various meanings. Context will usually make things clear. We’ve color-coded the meanings to make it easier to follow.

  • ‘his’ or ‘hers’
  • ‘yours’ (formal singular)
  • ‘theirs’
  • ‘yours’ (formal plural) 

¡Dios o!

My God!

No sé dónde están tus hermanos. Veo los hermanosos por allí.

I don’t know where your brothers are. I see my brothers over there.

No llores, hija a.

Don’t cry, my dear (my daughter).

Paula y Claudia son amigasas.

Paula and Claudia are friends of mine.



Fue un error tuyo.

It was a mistake of yours (it was your mistake).

Fueron unos errores tuyos.

They were mistakes of yours.

Fue una idea tuya.

It was an idea of yours (it was your idea).

Fueron unas ideas tuyas.

They were ideas of yours.

Cell
Cell

Necesito encontrar a Pablo. Tengo que devolverle un documento suyo.

I need to find Pablo. I have to give back a document of his.

Necesito encontrar a Pablo. Tengo que devolverle unos documentos suyos.

I need to find Pablo. I have to give back some documents of his.

Necesito encontrar a Pablo. Tengo que devolverle una corbata suya.

I need to find Pablo. I have to give back a necktie of his.

Necesito encontrar a Pablo. Tengo que devolverle unas corbatas suyas.

I need to find Pablo. I have to give back some neckties of his.

¿Es un conocido suyo?

Is he an acquaintance of yours (formal singular)?

¿Son unos conocidos suyos?

Are they acquaintances of yours?

¿Es una amiga suya?

Is she a friend (female) of yours?

¿Son unas amigas suyas?

Are they friends (females) of yours?



Es un traje nuestro.

It’s a suit of ours.

Son unos trajes nuestros.

They’re suits of ours.

Es una hermana nuestra.

She’s a sister of ours.

Son unas hermanas nuestras.

They’re some of our sisters.



Chicos, es un logro vuestro.

Guys, it’s an achievement of yours (familiar plural).

Chicos, son todos unos logros vuestros.

Guys, they’re all achievements of yours.

Chicos, ¿fue esto una broma suya?

Guys, was this a prank of yours?

Chicos, ¿fueron unas bromas suyas?

Guys, were they pranks of yours?



Juan es un compañero suyo.

Juan is a colleague of theirs.

Juan y Pol son unos compañeros suyos.

Juan and Pol are colleagues of theirs.

Ana es una prima suya.

Ana is a cousin (female) of theirs.

Ana y Andrea son unas primas suyas.

Ana and Andrea are cousins (female) of theirs.

Señores, ya hemos escuchado un discurso suyo.

Gentlemen, we have already heard a speech of yours (formal plural).

Señores, ya hemos escuchado unos discursos suyos.

Gentlemen, we have already heard speeches of yours.

Señores, leí una carta suya.

Gentlemen, I read a letter of yours.

Señores, leí unas cartas suyas.

Gentlemen, I read some letters of yours.

Spanish Possessive Pronouns

Sometimes the longer form is used with the definite article (el/la/los/las).

The difference is that in these cases, the possessive is acting as a pronoun, meaning that it replaces the noun rather than modifying it.

The possessive pronouns are the same as the longer form possessives as mentioned above. Here’s a reminder:

mío(s)/mía(s)mine
tuyo(s)/tuya(s)yours (familiar singular)
suyo(s)/suya(s)his/hers
yours (formal singular)
nuestro(s)/nuestra(s)ours
vuestro(s)/vuestra(s)yours (familiar plural)
suyo(s)/suya(s)theirs
yours (formal plural)

Again, remember that suyo(s)/suya(s) can have various meanings, so we’ve used the same color-coding as above.

Este plátano es elo.

This banana is mine (my one).

Estos plátanos son losos.

These bananas are mine (my ones).

Esa fresa es la mía.

That strawberry is mine (my one).

Esas fresas son lasas.

Those strawberries are mine (my ones).

Cell
Cell

Vi el tuyo.

I saw yours (your one).

Vi los tuyos.

I saw yours (your ones).

Vi la tuya.

I saw yours (your one).

Vi las tuyas.

I saw yours (your ones).

Cell
Cell

¿Cuál perro?

El suyo.

Which dog?

Hers (her one).

¿Cuáles perros?

Los suyos.

Which dogs?

Hers (her ones).

¿De cuál falda hablamos?

La suya.

Which skirt are we talking about?

Hers (her one).

¿De cuáles faldas hablamos?

Las suyas.

Which skirts are we talking about?

Hers (her ones).

Este libro es el suyo.

This book is yours (formal singular) (your one).

Estos libros son los suyos.

These books are yours (your ones).

Creo que esta bebida es la suya.

I think this drink is yours (your one).

Creo que estas bebidas son las suyas.

I think these drinks are yours (your ones).

Cell
Cell

Ese es el nuestro.

This one is ours (our one).

Esos son los nuestros.

These ones are ours (our ones).

Esa es la nuestra.

That one is ours (our one).

Esas son las nuestras.

Those ones are ours (our ones).

Cell
Cell

Mi deseo es aprender. ¿Y el vuestro?

My desire is to learn. And yours (familiar plural) (your one)?

Mis planes son claros. ¿Y los vuestros?

My plans are clear. And yours (your ones)?

La idea de ellos es impresionante. ¿Cuál es la vuestra?

Their idea is impressive. What is yours (your one)?

Las ideas de ellos son impresionantes. ¿Ya tenéis las vuestras?

Their ideas are impressive. Do you have yours (your ones) already?

Cell
Cell

Juan y Ángel viven en la esquina. El edificio marrón es el suyo.

Juan and Ángel live on the corner. The brown building is theirs (their one).

Juan y Ángel aparcaron allí. Los coches azules son los suyos.

Juan and Ángel parked over there. The blue cars are theirs (their ones).

Juan y Ángel viven en la esquina. La casa verde es la suya.

Juan and Ángel live on the corner. The green house is theirs (their one).

Juan y Ángel aparcaron allí. Las motos negras son las suyas.

Juan and Ángel parked over there. The black motorcycles are theirs (their ones).

Señores y señoras, este camarero es el suyo.

Ladies and gentlemen, this waiter is yours (your one).

Señores y señoras, estos camareros son los suyos.

Ladies and gentlemen, these waiters are yours (your ones).

Señores y señoras, esta mesa es la suya.

Ladies and gentlemen, this table is yours (your one).

Señores y señoras, estas mesas son las suyas.

Ladies and gentlemen, these tables are yours (your ones).

Cool extra stuff

  • You can also use a long form possessive with lo to refer to some unnamed business, or to say that you’re in your element:
¡Mi novio sabe lo nuestro!My boyfriend knows about us!
Lo vuestro es fascinante.That stuff with you guys is fascinating.
Eso es el mío.This is my thing/I’m in my element.
  • We have lots of phrases in English where we use a possessive with body parts. In Spanish, we actually don’t use the Spanish possessives in these cases:
Me duele la cabeza.My head hurts.
Dame la mano.Give me your hand.
Cierra la boca.Shut your mouth.

Quiz

For the following sentences, pick the correct possessive.

1. Es _ decisión. (It’s your decision.)

      a. tu

      b. su

      c. nuestra

Click to reveal the correct answer:

2. Admiro _ valentía. (I admire her bravery.)

      a. mis

      b. su 

      c. tuyo 

Click to reveal the correct answer:

3. Juan es muy amigo _. (Juan is a very good friend of mine.)

      a. mío

      b. suyo

      c. mía

Click to reveal the correct answer:

4. Tomás es un cliente _. (Tomás is one of our clients.)

      a. tuyo

      b. vuestro

      c. nuestro

Click to reveal the correct answer:

5. Aquí tengo _ móvil. ¿Dónde está el _? (I have my phone here. Where is yours?)

      a. su, tuyo

      b. mi, tuyo

      c. mío, su

Click to reveal the correct answer:

6. He traído _ propia comida pero no he traído la _. (I’ve brought my own food but I haven’t brought hers.)

      a. mi, suya

      b. su, mía

      c. mía, su

Click to reveal the correct answer:

We know there’s a looot to take in here, so don’t worry if you don’t get it all at first. Practice a little every day, that’s our advice, and soon you'll see that Spanish possessives will be a breeze!

Do you like this guide on Spanish possessives? For more lessons like this, check out the following: 

A Quick Guide to Spanish Subjunctives

Spanish Conjunctions

Negatives in Spanish

About the Author Annabel Beilby

Annabel is a language-enthusiast from the UK. She studied Spanish and French at the University of Southampton (with an Erasmus study year in Madrid!) and recently graduated. She has interests across the Spanish-speaking world, and is a fan of language in general.

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