10 Things I Hate About Living in Spain

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February 2, 2024

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Hola, amigos! If you've been following my adventures, you know how much I adore living in Spain. But hey, it's not always flamenco and paella. Let's dive into the ten shocking truths about life in Spain that nobody talks about. These are the things I hate about living in Spain.

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Siesta Time:

While midday breaks sound dreamy, they're not so fun when you're trying to get things done. Small businesses shut down, and noise levels drop from 3 to 5 p.m. That's prime nap time, and it can be tough to adjust to.

Closed Sundays:

Sundays are for relaxation, but almost everything shuts down. If you need to run errands, do it before Sunday hits, or you're out of luck.

Late Arrivals:

Punctuality isn't a strong suit here. Arriving late is more of a norm than an exception. If you're planning a gathering, expect your guests to arrive fashionably late.
Cold Houses in the South: Surprisingly, houses in the south can get chilly in winter due to poor insulation. It's a stark contrast to the scorching summers where you dare not venture outside until dusk.

Cold Houses in the South:

Surprisingly, houses in the south can get chilly in winter due to poor insulation. It's a stark contrast to the scorching summers where you dare not venture outside until dusk.

Loudness:

Conversations here aren't just chats; they're public announcements. While it's entertaining at times, it can be a headache when you're trying to focus.

Taxes and Cost of Living:

The price of paradise comes with a hefty tax bill. High taxes and rising living costs can pinch your wallet.

Sexism:

Unsolicited comments towards women can make public spaces uncomfortable. It's a societal issue that needs addressing.

Bullfighting:

The tradition of bullfighting is a divisive topic. For many, it's a cruel spectacle that tarnishes Spain's image.

Kissing Greetings:

The tradition of kissing greetings can be exhausting, especially when meeting new people. A simple handshake would suffice, thank you!

Public Amenities:

Finding clean public toilets can be a challenge. It's best to plan your bathroom breaks ahead of time.

Living in Spain has its quirks and challenges, but it's still the best place for me. What are your thoughts? Have you experienced any of these? Let me know in the comments below!

Conclusion: 

Living in Spain is a beautiful journey filled with ups and downs. Despite the challenges, the vibrant culture and lifestyle make it all worthwhile. If you're curious about the flip side, check out "10 Things I Hate about Living in Spain" for more insights. Hasta pronto!

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